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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the business round table today about the ongoing fiscal cliff talks. boeing ceo jim mcnerny says the business leaders want a balanced solution to short and long-term deficit issues. >>> and facebook is joining the nasdaq 100 index. it will be joining the index next wednesday and replaces tech firm emphasis who is moving to the new york stock exchange. >>> our guest host here to take on the financial cliff as well as false assumptions investors may be making about what the markets will do come january. joining us is dan greenhouse and chris walen, senior managing director. just looking through some of your comments, dan, you don't think we should go over, obviously. >> well, we were -- chris and i were joking in the green room. a lot of the policies in the cliff to us personally are anathema, but that's probably going to happen and what should happen. >> bring it on. >> you think -- >> look, subject americans to the minimum tax. >> yeah, they'll understand. >> the democrats want to raise taxes so they can spend more. they derive economic sustenance from spending. you've got to understand the d
and these fiscal cliff concerns really mean for businesses and your money. jim aim most, chairman of tasti delight and plan net smoothie. we have the ceo of fastsigns. jamie richardson is the vice president of white castle. we have a power panel. thanks for joining us. i want to start with news from clarence otis, ceo of darden restaurants. obviously he came out of and said the forecast for his company going forward is looking very bleak. the negative media coverage focused on darden and how they might accommodate health care reform. he said they would have to go ahead and use many more part-time workers because obamacare was simply too expensive. there was a big backlash against that. so he is going to have to go ahead and, as a result, they are going to keep full-time workers on. they're stuck with the cost of obamacare. he also said, they're having a tough time, people aren't coming into the restaurants because the economy is bad. so in my mind he spoke out. he got punished for it. at the same time the economy is terrible. he is really struggling. at the end of the day he will not hire more peo
in the coming year if we can get a deal on the fiscal cliff, that is the big question. businesses which have held off investing and hiring because of uncertainty over the fiscal outlook might finally open their wallets, that means more jobs too. a little bit more optimism potentially on the horizon. even if a tough jobs market and maybe an unpredictable economy there are some ways to get ahead. these why we what wanted to talk to our next guest who knows thing or two about that. joining us now, kat cole the president of cinnabon. you have a very unique journey to the position you have today. it all started at hooters, right? >> yeah, i started out like many teenagers, my first job in malls and restaurants, and i got a job at hooters as a hostess and worked my way up and became a waitress at haouters for a fe hooters, when the cooks quit i began to cook. that sent me all over the world opening up new hooters restaurants on continents outside of north america and getting great business experience. jenna: you were traveling to places like australia and central and south america to open up the f
with erskine bowles and business leaders about averting the fiscal cliff and achieving an approach the white house says it wants. i made clear that we put real concessions on the line by putting revenues on the table right upfront. unfortunately, many democrats continue to rule out spending cuts that must be part of any significant agreement will reduce our deficit. mr. bowles himself said yesterday there has been no serious discussion so far. there is a real danger of going off the fiscal cliff. going off the fiscal cliff will hurt our economy. it will cost american jobs. republicans have taken action to avert the fiscal cliff by passing legislation to stop all the tax hikes, to replace the sequester, and pave the way for tax reform and entitlement reform. we are the only ones with a balanced plan to protect the economy, protect american jobs, and protect the middle class from the fiscal cliff. without spending cuts and entitlement reform, it will be impossible to address our country's debt crisis and get our economy going again and to create jobs. right now all eyes are on the white house.
council in washington at 10:45 eastern as he pushes for a budget plan to avoid the fiscal cliff, that includes high tax rates for the wealthy. house republicans are meeting with small business owners today. lawmakers are divided on how much they should compromise with the white house. this is a day after the house speaker john boehner unveiled a budget proposal that included some revenue concession but he faced heavy criticism. mitch mcconnell wouldn't publicly endorse boehner's plan, while jim demint says it would destroy jobs. at the same time, the kkr co-chairman and ceo henry kravis says uncertainty is the main reason why investing isn't happening right now. he says many companies are rushing to close deals before the end of the year, concerns about whether the capital gains tax will rise. he says the fiscal cliff shouldn't be a big issue, and if businessmen got into the room they could solve the problem much faster than congress. >>> adding his tuppence, he says they'll have to get used to it and the fiscal cliff is one of the reasons. >> we have structural influences that
house at the business roundtable about the economy. fiscal cliff certainly the issue in the short term for a lot of big businesses and certainly for a lot of american taxpayers. however, long term is another story when it comes to the economy, and entitlements, the president referring to that as well. as we continue to get that feedback you can check it out foxnews.com, in the meantime we're going to move onto other news as well. >> reporter: and so let's begin with the violence that is appearing to really spiral out of control. secretary of state hillary clinton says she fears a desperate president bashar al-assad in syria may resort to using chemical weapons on his own people. in the meantime, the united nations is hint thag there wil hinting that there will be no asylum for bashar al-assad as the syrian dictator makes it clear that he will die before leaving the country under any circumstances. what is going on behind the scenes, for that we turn to corn powell following all the latest developments from our mideast bureau in jerusalem. connor. >> reporter: the international and inte
, and fox business network lori rothman. let's start with, if we may. this fiscal cliff. the republicans, as i mentioned, they are not mounting any kind of response to the charge by the administration. >> not surprising. the republicans have been known for as long time as the stupid party, they are a hot mess, they came out of this elect on the losing end, they have done nothing to try to regroup, this affects every american's life and pocketbook, they still can't get it together with a coherent message based on their core principals, economic freedom, and liberty, if you can't stand for those, and fight for them, they have no business being one of the two major political parties. >> monica is right, the republicans have allowed obama to ccntrol the debate, we have the morale high ground and our plan, obama in 2011 talking about tax reform said we can -- we don't have to raise tax rates, we can lower tax rates by capping deducts. he said that. lou: where is coordinated action and rhetoric from the party? i'm talking about from mayors to governors. >> we have been great with policy, but w
to protect the family business, continue to grow while at the same time make sure we solve this fiscal cliff. look, each and every day as we walk the halls, you continue to ask the questions. you want the answers to solving the fiscal cliff. we put the offer on the table and the president now has to engage. the next 72 hours are critical. if he sits back and continues to play politics, that will give you the answer of where we're going. this is the opportunity for the country to lead and opportunity for the president to lead. >> as these fiscal cliff negotiations and debate continues, i think it's important to remember that washington doesn't have a revenue problem, it has a spending problem. and under this administration, under president obama, we have seen record deficits and a record debt accumulate, and yet he keeps demanding that we have seen record deficits and a record debt accumulate, and yet he keeps demanding that we raise taxes to pay for more spending. this will only hurt our economy. ernst and young has done an analysis of the president's proposal and said it will cost several h
-called fiscal cliff. this is in fact the family and business tax cut certainty act of 2012. while i hope that the negotiations to avert the fiscal cliff are successful, in my view we should not wait for a grand bargain in order to finish work on this important tax extender legislation. tax extenders are different from the other fiscal cliff issues for three basic reasons, and let me describe those reasons. first tax extenders are much less contentious than the other end of year problems that we -- that need to be resolved. the tax extender bill on the senate calendar has strong bipartisan support. in august, the finance committee approved it by a large margin. we have support from six republicans, including the ranking member, senator hatch. all 13 democrats supported it. i believe that many more republicans will vote for this legislation if it's brought up for consideration here in the senate. the bill consists entirely of tax cuts. it should not be difficult to get senators to vote for tax cuts, right before christmas especially. most of these tax cuts have solid bipartisan support. ma
to pennsylvania to visit a small business today to talk about the fiscal cliff. unfortunately, the president and members of his own party who were proposing that we let many small businesses -- as in hundreds of thousands of them -- go over the fiscal cliff. simply put, that's why we don't have an agreement as yet. they said yesterday, this is not a game. i used to be a small business owner. small business owners are regular men and women from all backgrounds who, in today's economy, are facing challenges on a daily basis. the president's tax increase would be another crippling blow for them while doing little to nothing to solve the bigger problem here, our national deficit and national debt. this debt doesn't exist because we don't tax small businesses enough, it exists because washington continues to spend too much and raising taxes on small businesses instead of taking a balanced approach that also cuts spending is wrong. it's only going to make it harder for our economy to grow and if our economy doesn't grow, americans don't get new jobs and the debt problem that we have will continue
to the world that we are open for business. short of going off the fiscal cliff entirely, passing the senate tax increase instead of proposing these, or pursuing these progrowth and fiscal reform ideas is the worst idea on the table. raising the top two marginal rates would reverse long-standing tax policy and hit nearly a million business owners in the process. it would eliminate over 700,000 jobs, as i said. if the president is genuinely interested in economic growth and higher tax reference that come from -- revenues that come from it, he should drop his demands for the senate bill and listen to the consensus that higher taxes hurt growth and lower taxes help create jobs and prosperity. the presiding officer: the senator from alabama. mr. sessions: i appreciate senator kyl's comments. i share them and just would say we're going to miss the most knowledgeable fiscal tax expert in the senate. his long career includes time on the finance committee. thank you, senator kyl. i want to express some reservations about the negotiations that have been going on, as i understand it, reading the paper
stories day after day on the so-called fiscal cliff often omit that the senate has passed legislation to shield 98% of families and 97% of small businesses from the income tax part of this so-called fiscal cliff. we passed the middle-class tax cuts act on july 25 of this year and we sent the measure to the house of representatives. did speaker boehner and the republicans in the house promptly pass this popular bill and send it to president obama for his signature? did they move to protect 98% of middle-class families from this tax hike in january? no. no. they decided to hold the middle-class tax cuts passed by the senate hostage in an attempt to push for tax cuts for the folks they care the most about, the top 2% of highest earning households. republicans fighting for millionaires and billionaires is not a new story. in 2001, president george w. bush decided to spend a large portion of the surpluses he inherited from president clinton to cut tax rates. many democrats opposed him then because the tax cuts were unfair, favoring the highest-income americans. to overcome that obstacle, t
are mired in conversations about a fiscal cliff on the very right now. we're talking about long-term infrastructure build-out, a long-term energy plan. what role should c.e.o.'s have and the federal government have in making sure this gets done? >> this is the perfect opportunity for the federal government and for state governments to work together to achieve a common goal, right? there's plenty of times where, when we run a business, our interests might not coalesce with the interests of either of the parties. as fred said, this is the opportunity that we have never had in this country before, where you can have consumer, the business and the governments all working together to take advantage of this huge resource, if you want to call it saudi america. from a waste management perspective, for us it makes so much sense, because it makes business sense. we get about $1.65 equivalent with natural gas and $4.10 diesel, so it makes great sense for our business. from a government point of view everybody today is talking about jobs and the fiscal cliff. our recommendations in the repo
-called fiscal cliff is a solvable problem. critical as the holidays approach and businesses make investment and hiring decisions for next year. while polls show many americans are pessimistic, there's optimism in this home. >> i got a sense that he's confident that what's best for the american people will happen. >> yeah. >> reporter: you agree? >> yes. >> i do too. >> reporter: but for now, the gop's resisting any tax increases even on those upper income americans. house republicans of course have made the counteroffer with $800 billion in new revenue and an overhaul of the tax code. wolf, they feel as if they have moved the ball, but they don't believe that the president is interested in avoiding the fiscal cliff. >> these negotiations, dan, they usually go until the bitter, bitter end. a lot of folks are assuming that before that end there will be a deal. give us a flavor of the mood at the white house. >> reporter: well, i think they're preparing for this fiscal cliff scenario to play out, wolf. but as you point out when we look back over the last three years, we've had these kinds of n
on the fiscal cliff. what is going on, rich edson? "imus in the morning" rich: house republicans will host the events with small business leaders in their districts and highlight what republicans say will be the economic damage small-business from raising income-tax rates on families earning $250,000 a year. president obama is leaving washington too though he is only heading across the potomac river, going to suburban virginia to speak to a middle-class family and he will press congress to protect those making less than $250,000 a year from tax increases by raising rates on those making more. in washington it is the same fight. >> president obama, democrats in congress have ever been ambiguous, provide economic security for 90% of american families and 97% of small businesses asking the wealthiest 2% to contribute just a little more to stop this runaway debt. >> what the president is really interested in as we learned just yesterday he is getting as much taxpayer money as he can first by raising taxes on small business that he believes are making too much money and then on everybody else.
is pushing ahead with the fiscal cliff pr campaign. he is meeting with a middle class family in northern virginia, and the white house says the president is going to talk about his efforts to extend tax cuts for the middle class as part of this debt deal. well, some economists are predicting that the country will go into another recession if this debt deal is not reached. any deal that the lawmakers and white house come up with is also going to have a major impact, so joining us to talk a little bit about it, peter morrissey. he is a business professor at the university of maryland, and our own chief business xhnt ali velshi. you wrote something, an article here, predicting that these tax hikes, the spending cuts likely in the debt deal, could push unemployment, you believe, from 7.9% all the way to 10%. how so? >> well, simply it will cut spending in the economy. the wealthy will have less money to spend, but the government will likely be spending a lot less money as well because the republicans are going to want spending cuts. you combine, say, about $250 billion in spending and tax cu
in washington on the so-called fiscal cliff. president obama plans to enter questions from business members. the group has been urging action to prevent huge automatic tax increases in january. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. [video clip] >> we have not coordinated care. all these services have so many cracks that the cracks are as harmful as the diseases that we're treating. you have to step back and ask, are we hurting people overall? what are we doing? now we have the report saying 30% of everything we do not be necessary in health care. 30% of medications we subscribe, the test and procedures we order. this is something for the first time been called out as a problem. >> this function in the health- care industry. what hospitals will not tell you. urday night at 10:00 p.m. on c-span2. >> "washington journal" continues. host: we have been focusing on different aspects of the fiscal cliff. we want to look at capital gains tax and the estate tax. what is the estate tax? guest: it goes back to history -- it was put in place to prevent the united states from developin
is closely tracking all of this. the progress or lack of progress on the fiscal cliff talks and also wondering who is going to be the next treasury secretary. joining me steve rattner, wall street finance year, former head of president obama's auto task force. thanks for joining us, steve. first of all, what about the scenario that oh let's just let them go over the cliff and won't matter and the markets will view it as a nonevent. what do you think some. >> certainly going to matter. there's no question it's going to matter. it's going to matter to the markets. we don't know how much. this is an unprecedented situation, at least in my lifetime. we've had crises and debt ceilings and all that, but going over a cliff like this is a new one. the markets would be volatile, extremely -- a lot of downward pressure on them. and then the question would be how do businesses and consumers behave and quickly do they pull back? everyone knows the immediate impact from the government coming back and spending wouldn't be that great. the question then is how do businesses and consumers react? i do
. >>> americans could be singing the blues if congress doesn't act to avert the fiscal cliff. the longer congress waits the more complicated for businesses to figure out how much to pay workers early next year. the confusion could cost employers money, especially small businesses which use payroll software which takes time away from running their business. starbucks ceo howard schultz agrees. >> this single issue has a seismic affect on the rest of the world that we have never been as connected in the domino effect of a bad outcome here will have significant negative consequences domestically and around the world. >> negative consequences, seismic or not, none is stopping starbucks plans for 1,500 more cafes across america next year. and just as many around the world. but we get his point. >>> speaking of the fiscal cliff, we know what the parameters of a deal in congress will look like, right? on taxes, republicans give in to raise taxes on the wealthiest 2% and democrats will agree to rein in tax breaks, right? democrats are fighting hard to preserve the tax deduction for state and local taxes,
's the way it will be for much of december, unless there's a huge headline on the fiscal cliff talks. back with the mayor of phoenix trying to lure people away from california. stuart: businesses in california fleeing that state, tax rates, cost of doing business just too much. one place they are going to phoenix, arizona. here's why, according to the phoenix economic council, operating costs are 40% lower than in california. arizona so attractive to business that in the last eight years more than 60 california companies have relocated there. phoenix mayor greg stanton joins us right now. your honor, welcome to the show. good to have you with us. >> great to be on, thanks for having me. stuart: okay, now, you have got a great climate, understand that. your costs are 40% lower, but i want to know, did you prize those california companies over to you by giving them huge tax breaks? >> we want to make sure in arizona that we are as competitive as possible. stuart: is that a yes? programs, tax incentives, but look, a company is not going to move, a company is not going to expand in arizona jus
your business this morning, markets in a holding pattern as fiscal cliff talks continue in washington. but the s&p 500 is up 12% so far this year. and a 20-year veteran investment strategy at goldman sachs, abby joseph cohen, she estimates stocks could rise another 10% to 15% next year. she says the fundamentals of the u.s. are solid, despite the fiscal cliff concerns coming out of washington. she says stocks could get hit in the early part of the area if we go over the fiscal cliff, but the fundamentals of the economy are still good. >>> all right. apple stock dropped more than 6% yesterday. shares were down about half a percent in pre-market trading this morning. no concrete news pushing them down, but today there's another hearing in the patent case with samsung in california. and a tech research report generatored a lot of buzz that apple's tablet competitors could eat into its market share. >> interesting. >> thanks, christine. >>> well, the good news is, let's do the fiscal cliff and the good news. and it's not very much. but at least the two sides are talking, by phone. not fac
on fiscal cliff negotiation struck a much different tone. if republicans don't but specifically tax rates on upper earners the white house is ready to go right over the cliff. >> we see there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2%. >> largely backs the president on those rates. 48% support the plan to raise them on upper earners compared to 32% of leaving rates unchanged. when it comes to government spending, the gop has the edge. to help balance the budget, spending cuts should take precedence over tax hikes, 46 to 30%. and leaders in congress who met with business leaders say they have already offered to raise tax by cutting deductions and the president has yet to counter their proposal. >> i'll be here and available at any moment to sit down with the president if he gets serious about solving this problem. >> it's possible the white house may be bluffing, the administration did order the pentagon to consider the big cuts in military spending that would happen if we don't reach an agreement. in washington, doug luzader, fox news. >> stocks
with this fiscal cliff, of course, that's the great unknown. but it is making a lot of business leaders very, very nervous. christine romans, she spoke with one ceo who says leaders in washington, they're focused on the wrong issue. >> i asked the outspoken ceo of fedex how companies plan ahead when washington is so dysfunctional. >> well, i think most of the ceos look at the situation in washington with complete amazement and dismay to be frank about it. the problem is the ideological pinnings on both sides of this argument are so difficult to bridge that it's going to be hard for them to get a deal. >> this is a time when companies should be planning for next year. spending money, buying equipment, building factories, hiring workers. instead they have no idea what tax rates will be and whether congress will spark a new recession. and companies are already pulling back. you can see that in the third quarter gdp report. companies spending on software and equipment fell almost 3% in the quarter. we haven't seen that since the recession. s i asked fred smith if he would accept higher taxes to get a
? on the substance, the senate has passed a bill that goes a long way to address the fiscal cliff. that's already passed here. last july the senate passed a bill to continue tax cuts for 98% of all americans and 90% of all american small businesses. if the republican leader were serious about preventing us from going over the fiscal cliff, he would urge his colleague, the speaker, tpo get the house to -- to get the house to take up the senate-passed bill now. there are republicans who have already said that's the right thing to do, conservatives, moderates, we had one senator today who said she thinks that should happen. in the meantime -- that was a republican senator, by the way. the republican leader is, mr. president, just as stunned. the election is over. it's time to get down to business. mr. president, this paper he has, secretary geithner didn't bring that stack of stuff to me. it was a private meeting, trying to work something out with this very troublesome issue fating -- facing this country: the deficit, the debt. this private meeting turned out to be a publicity stunt for republicans
there in time for christmas. michael, on your deadline fiscal cliff we know when it happens january 1. the president's got his plan, the republicans have sort of a plan. the center for american progress came out with its own this week, why? you don't think the others are good enough? >> well, what we saw as a real need was a plan for comprehensive tax reform. not just nibbling around the edges but really trying to do something big and bold that would not only raise the revenue that we need and we do absolutely need to raise revenue but fix the problems in the tax code and we don't think that that's something that's going to happen in the next three weeks. we do think that that's something that's going to happen or could happen over the next year. and the parameters for that might be agreed upon in the next few weeks. we really wanted to put that out there and say listen, here are some really good ideas on how to really fundamentally reshape -- >> bill: first two or three points, what are you proposing in terms of raising the
to avert that fiscal cliff that we hear so much about. yesterday, after weeks of delay, and as the days dwindle and taxes are set to go up for millions of families and businesses, republicans in the house finally showed up at the negotiating table. and now we know why they've been holding their cards so close it their vest. their proposal would raise taxes on millions of middle-class families. their plan to raise $800 billion in revenue by eliminating popular tax deductions and credits would reach deep into pockets of middle-class families. republicans are so intent on protecting low tax rates for millionaires and billionaires, they're willing to sacrifice middle-class families' economic security to do so. at the first of the year, middle-class families, will get an average of $200 i,200 in additional taxes they'll have to pay. their proposal was short on specifics but we do know from independent analysis that it is impossible to raise enough revenue and make a dent in our deficit without using one of two things -- raising tax rates on the top 2% or raising taxes on the middle class. an
on the fiscal cliff, a focus this morning on the expiring tax provisions. host: today we're looking at the issue of tax extenders or tax incentives for business and individuals. and joining us in this discussion is sam goldfarb, who is a tax writer for c.q. roll call. what are tax extenders? >> well, they're temporary tax breaks. that's basically i think the most basic definition and some people are kind of concerned that the entire tax code is turning into one big tax extendser. so where do you really define it? but i think traditionally they're considered to be these pretty small provisions, narrowly targeted at specific types of businesses. some of them do apply to individuals as well. >> so why are they temporary? >> that's a good question. i think a lot of people, including people in congress, say either they should be made permanent or they should be eliminated altogether. but they're temporary because it's easier to pass that way. it looks like it costs less. usually they keep on being ex tended and extended. so so in effect they're almost permanent. host: we're going to look at some of t
ends might. she wrote concerned about tax increases and this fiscal cliff. she said, "the middle class is the heart and soul of this country. what keeps it going and growing? what else can we be hit with? i know i cannot take anything more on financially." so my first call today, madam president, is let's give deborah and families like hers in delaware and around the country the serntle before we end this -- the certainty before we end this calendar year of knowing their taxes will not go up in 26 days when the calendar turns to 201. one way to do that is for the moushouse to take up the legisln that this body has already considered in a bipartisan way that would extend the tax cuts for 98% of families and 97% of small businesses while also achieving nearly d is trillion of debt and deficit reduction. this bill extends tax cuts that would otherwise expire for all americans who earn income and for all small businesses, but just on the first $250,000. tax ratetax rates on income abot would revert to tax rates during the clinton administration. this one step would blunt the impact of the
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)